Jonas Edvard about his project for Walden – Schloss Hollenegg for Design

Oyster mushrooms can be grown into a shape that is both a food resource and a functional object. During a period of several weeks, the mycelium – the root like structure of the mushroom organism – grows together with textile…

Jonas Edvard about his project for Walden - Schloss Hollenegg for Design

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Oyster mushrooms can be grown into a shape that is both a food resource and a functional object. During a period of several weeks, the mycelium – the root like structure of the mushroom organism – grows together with textile and hemp fibres – an agricultural waste product – into a flexible textile. The material can be moulded into different shapes, folded and grown further into a solid composite structure. Eventually it will be dried out to become a lightweight, insulating, organic and compostable structure: a chair that will improves the quality of the soil when it will be composted.
Mushrooms live from breaking down the cellulose in the plant fibres, thus creating the living soil along with plants and insects. Without mushrooms and mycelium we would have no forests, no oxygen and no life on the planet. The Mycelium project uses a living organism to transform waste to product. It illustrates how we are connected with species outside our system in order to support our basic needs: understanding this underlaying relationship helps us reflect on our need for cohabitation with nature and how this symbiosis is able to generate a positive response in human life.

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